Where Hump Days Don’t Exist

I led a team to the slums of Caracas, Venezuela, to deliver much needed supplies, clothing and help repair a school.

The people we encountered were the poorest of the poor, living upon garbage dumps alongside rivers poisoned with raw sewage. Extremely crowded conditions, rampant crime and lack of employment added to the challenge of living day to day. But, they did.

Long days and nights in sweltering heat blurred the calendar.

Working alongside Oscar, a local leader, one morning, I asked, “What day is it?” His response was telling. “New day.” I retorted, “Yes, I know…but, is it Wednesday?”

“No. New day!” Again, “So, it’s Thursday?” (I just needed to know, ugh!) He flashed his toothless smile. “Brent, here, every day is just new day.” 

Since then, I’ve had no Hump Days. And, tomorrow isn’t Thursday, it’s “new day”. 

Live fully in it. Just like Oscar. (140 words)

The “Do-Over” is Your Best Move

It happened, again. I walked into our house after a pretty lousy day and was greeted by my cheery wife who just got home from an apparently really good day. I had a choice to make; allow her to continue in her joy, or bring her down to my level as misery certainly loves company. I chose the latter. No!!!

Hey, can I try that, again?” I asked. She responded with a “That’d be swell” nod and wink. After comically moonwalking out the door, I took a deep breath and reentered. “Hi, gorgeous, it’s good to be home, even better to see you!” She planted a big one on me and we laughed.

Do-overs should occur often with your kids, boss, classroom, parents, spouse, coworkers and friends. It’s what leaders do.

I’m getting better at do-overs, but it sure is humbling. (140 words)

flyby

If you’re looking for a quick pick-me-up a few days a week, check out the new “flyby” section of leaderbird!

Click FLYBY above  (between HOME and ABOUT) or click HERE to see the first two entries.

These bits of info won’t come to your inbox (I’m not spammy like dat), only blog posts will continue to be sent out. You’ll need to stop by leaderbird to check for new entries or follow me on Twitter or Facebook as I will tweet/post each new flyby. Let’s fly! (91 words)

 

A Star Wasn’t Born

My Hollywood acting debut hit the big screen nearly ten years ago today as Walt Disney’s Mr. 3000 opened up in theaters nationwide.

 Sitting with my wife and boys in that small theater, my heart was pounding. I wondered, “Will people around me recognize that I’m in the film?” “Will this lead to other acting opportunities?” “Will I be able to drink this mega-soda without a poorly timed potty break?”

Nope. Nope. Aaaand, nope.

The director clearly defined my role from day one, “Your job is to allow Bernie Mac to shine. He’s the star. Less of you, more of him. Less of you, more of him.”

Job well done, I guess.  (If you pause the DVR and squint, you’ll see me from time to time. Rats.)

True leadership occurs, not while being IN the spotlight, but by HOLDING the spotlight.

Who are you “leading” today? Shine on, my friends, shine on! (137 words)

EXTRA: I enjoyed my time with Bernie and liked the movie. You can get a glimpse of the story via the trailer. If you don’t see the trailer below, click HERE

 

 

That Thing You Do

You amaze me. What you do for a living, for work, is something I’m quite certain I couldn’t.

Our trash collector, Donny, wakes up each day and does his thing. If I was a garbage man, I’d live in San Diego. He battles the snow, rain, and bad drivers while smiling. Seriously.

 Redd cuts our trees. He’s half monkey, I swear. Hard, sweaty, dangerous work. He loves what he does and is grateful for the opportunity.

Those reading this today are financial planners, insurance agents, stay at home moms, teachers, musicians, construction dudes, factory workers, truckers, pet groomers, realtors, fry cooks, environmental educators, health professionals, telemarketers, farmers, territory managers, administrative types, counselors, day-care providers, plumbers and more.

On this day, I raise my glass to you and say, “I need you to do what you do. Thanks for making life work.” (140 words)